Different breeds of dogs.

 

DASCHUND

by Dennis Fisher

 

 

This article is one of a great many articles written by Dennis Fisher about a very wide variety of subjects concerning different  dogs, such as obedience training, breeding, showing, health matters, training problems and other subjects.  All these articles appear on Dennis Fisher's websites.   Visit  http://www.allaboutgermanshepherddogs.com the site that has been set up specifically for German Shepherd Dog enthusiasts, or http://www.freedogadvice.com  if you interested in a breed   other than German Shepherd Dogs

 

The Daschund, a breed that originated in Germany, was originally bred to hunt badgers. In spite of its small size it was also used to hunt  foxes.  Because of itís long body, loose skin and keen sense of smell, the animal was able to burrow underground.

 

Although quite small, no more than 25 pounds, it is a sturdy, well-muscled animal.  It may be surprising to know that there six varieties of Daschund.  There are two distinct varieties the Standard and the Miniature, and each of these two varieties have three sub-divisions.

 

Both the Standard Daschund and Miniature Daschund have three varieties, the smooth-haired, wire-haired and long-haired.

 

Despite the difference in coat length,  all six varieties present no difficulty with regard to grooming.  While  the heavier coats do require a certain amount, and the wire-coating may require stripping occasionally, this does not involve a tremendous amount of work.  The smooth-coated Daschund requires nothing more than an occasional rub down with a cloth.

 

The Daschund has a delightful temperament, fun-loving, undemanding and very affectionate.  They do not require a great deal of exercise and are quite content to lie around.

In fact because of this they should not be over-fed otherwise they have a tendency to become overweight, which is of course unhealthy for any breed.

 

They are also inclined to bark unnecessarily.  But his can be corrected with training.  They are intelligent animals and will respond to firm, but  gentle correction.